Recreating

by Rabbi Nussbaum
VOLUME 97 NUMBER 9
September 18, 2020
ELUL 29, 5780
SPECIAL ROSH HASHANAH EDITION
Candlelighting Time 6:46 PM

         As we approach the Day of Judgment it is important that we ponder what specifically we should concentrate upon during our davening. It would seem that since we are being judged by the King of the world, it would be appropriate to focus our davening upon coronating Hashem. After all, that is one of the three themes of the Mussaf davening. Furthermore, the concept that we need to coronate Hashem  doesn’t seem to be the only theme of the day. When we blow the shofar during Mussaf, we recite a brief prayer denoting that today is the birthday of the world and we stand in judgment before Hashem. There seems to be a strong connection between the two. Does the fact that Rosh Hashanah is the birthday of the world influence the type of judgment that we are subjected to?

            Although we say that Rosh Hashanah is the birthday of the world, actually the world was created on the 25th day of Elul, a few days before. However, Adam was created on the sixth day which was the first day of Tishrei. Since Adam was the crown jewel of creation, the purpose behind the entire ex nihilo creation of the world, the first day of Tishrei, Rosh Hashanah is considered the day of the world’s creation. Again we may question what is the significance that Adam was created on Rosh Hashhanah?

        Perhaps the answer to that question is that the state of perfection of Adam was such that even the highest level of spirituality in the universe, the angels, were entranced by his stature and served him. That state of purity didn’t last too long, for Adam sinned within a few hours of his coming in to existence. However, it was a reality for a short time and it is the true reality of this world’s plan. Hashem made Adam refined and virtuous because that was the plan that Adam would be created and observe the couple of mitzvos that were incumbent upon him in Gan Eden and then the world would come to its zenith of completion, perfection!

           We are not perfect individuals, however, we can set goals. When our outlook is to reach the height of perfection, a 100% rating, then perhaps we can anticipate to elevate ourselves to a higher standard than we were observing before. And there are many facets to our lives and how we interact with Hashem on a daily basis. We daven everyday, study Torah daily, fulfill the mitzvos all the time. Surely, we could improve our davening skills and attempt to have a more intense focus on the words that we recite. When we study Torah is it possible that we could delve deeper in to the material and have a more comprehensive understanding of what we are learning about? Do we fulfill the mitzvos with passion or are we rather nonchalant about our performance? Definitely these questions plague us as we approach the time for our judgment. We are entrapped by the realization that we must improve ourselves yet faced with the unfortunately reality of our sometimes unimpressive performance. It is then that we turn toward our paragon, Adam, and think about the incredible potential that he possessed. Although he may have failed in his quest for perfection, nonetheless, there was a passion to succeed. Maybe we can garner those powers of struggle and implement them in to our lives and attempt to enhance our lives as well. Even if we may perhaps fail, the Heavenly court peers down upon us and smiles as we demonstrate an incredible desire to upgrade our lifestyle and become closer to Hashem.

A BYTE FOR ROSH HASHANAH

Adam was created on Rosh Hashanah, The primary role of a person is to perfect his speech. Therefore  on this Yom Tov we must devote ourselves to improving our speech which is fortified with the blowing of the shofar, our innermost voice loudly resounding and ascending to the heavens.         S’FAS EMES

GOOD SHABBOS AND  YOM TOV
MAY WE HAVE A YEAR OF THE BEST OF HEALTH AND SUCCESS IN ALL OF  OUR ENDEAVORS

K’SIVA V’CHASIMA TOVA

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